OCRF & Ovarian Cancer National Alliance are now one strong, united, inspiring voice!
Ovarian Cancer Research Fund (OCRF) and the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (OCNA) have led the way in advocacy, research and support for patients and their families for over 22 years. As of January 2016, we are pleased to announce we are joining together to form Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance (OCRFA), the largest global organization dedicated to advancing ovarian cancer research while supporting women and their families. Read the exciting news!

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Strength in Numbers: OCRF and OCNA Unite to Form OCRFA

(1/26/16) Ovarian Cancer Research Fund (OCRF) and the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (OCNA) have led the way in advocacy, research and support for patients and their families for over 22 years. As of January 2016, we are pleased to announce we are joining together to form Ovarian Cancer Research Fund... 

Increased Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer associated with BRIP1 Gene

(January 27, 2016) A new study of 8,000 women reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute reports that carrying mutations in a gene called BRIP1 raised a woman’s chance of getting ovarian cancer in her lifetime to approximately 5%– nearly three times greater than chance women generally... 

OCRF Research Finds Inherited Mutations in 18% with Ovarian Cancer

Barbara Norquist, MD Elizabeth Swisher, MD (Jan. 8, 2016) OCRF grantees Dr. Barbara Norquist and Dr. Elizabeth Swisher were part of a team that recently released a study which investigated the occurrence, and role of, inherited cancer associated genes in a randomly selected population of women diagnosed... 

Study Results Show Ovarian Cancer Screening Doesn’t Save Lives; Researchers Optimistic About Future Results

(December 17, 2015) This morning in London, researchers announced the long-awaited final results of the United Kingdom Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS). The trial showed that average-risk, post-menopausal women who were screened for ovarian cancer based on a test called ROCA... 

Team Twedt: Taking on Ovarian Cancer, One Ironman at a Time

(12/17/15) Ask anyone who’s taken on the grueling series of events that make up an Ironman competition–a 2.4 mile swim and 112 mile bike ride, followed by a 26.2 mile run–and they might tell you that when it comes to mentally preparing for this kind of challenge, sometimes it’s easier not to... 

Under the Microscope: OCRF’s 2015 Research Progress Report

(12/14/15) | In 2015, OCRF grantees made several significant advances in the fight against ovarian cancer, including: Pinpointing two genes that trigger ovarian cancer Identifying a new therapeutic strategy for clear cell ovarian cancer Discovering how a tailored surgical approach leads to better outcomes Finding... 

Nintedanib Delays Progression of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

(December 4, 2015) According to the results of a phase III trial of over 1,000 women, women with advanced ovarian cancer gained significant delays in the progression of their disease when they were treated with the drug nintedanib plus carboplatin/paclitaxel, compared with women treated with carboplatin/paclitaxel... 

OCRF Research Identifies Targetable Mutations in Low Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

(December 2, 2015) Research funded in part by an OCRF grant to Rachel Grisham, MD has identified new, potentially targetable mutations in patients with low grade serous ovarian cancer. Dr. Grisham is a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York and is a 2014 recipient of... 

OCRF Research Offers Insight on How Ovarian Cancer Grows

Ron Buckanovich, MD, PhD (December 1, 2015) Research funded in part by Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, and published in PNAS, offers new insights into how ovarian cancer grows—and the potential to stop it. Can any cancer cell form another tumor, or is it only select cancer stem cells that give rise to... 

Better Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients with History of Oral Contraceptive Use

(November 20, 2015) A study published in BMC Cancer demonstrates that ovarian cancer patients who had a history of oral contraceptive use had better outcomes than those who had not previously used them. Dr. Aminah Jatoi and co-author Dr. Ellen Goode, both of the Mayo Clinic, examined 1,398 cases during...