Living with Ovarian Cancer

Having ovarian cancer changes your life and the lives of people closest to you. Surgery and chemotherapy can be quite overwhelming and you and your loved ones may experience a range of emotions, including anxiety, sadness, anger and frustration.

You may worry about being able to care for your family, keeping your job or continuing your daily activities. Then there are concerns about treatments and side effects, hospital stays and medical bills. Doctors, nurses and other members of your health care team can answer questions about treatment, work and other activities. A social worker, counselor, member of the clergy or a dear friend or relative can help you work through anxieties and concerns. Resources are also available to help with financial aid, transportation, home care and psychological support.

Some women find ovarian cancer support groups helpful. In the groups, patients, family members and loved ones meet and talk about what they have learned about treatment and coping with the disease. Sometimes, though, it can be painful to be in a support group because members may have a recurrence and that can cause anxiety for the other participants. You may also want to consult a mental health provider, such as a social worker, psychologist or a psychiatrist. Other types of one-on-one support are available by telephone or on the Internet.

OCRF also has spoken with women living with ovarian cancer and doctors who treat them and collected some of their recommendations and guidance, which you can read in the next sections of the website.

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Zip Code