History

Ann Schreiber had a vision—diagnosed with ovarian cancer, she envisioned a national organization that would one day rid the world of this terrible disease, while also supporting the women and their loved ones going through the process of treatment, getting better, and living beyond a diagnosis even with the possibility of recurrence.  While staying with Ann in the hospital, her husband, Sol, met and talked with the families and friends of other ovarian cancer patients.  Recognizing how limited information was, and how little research was being supported, they resolved to start an organization to combat not only ovarian cancer the disease, but also the isolation and fear so often felt by patients and their families.  In 1994, Ann’s vision was realized in Ovarian Cancer Research Fund (OCRF).

Just a few years later, Liz Tilberis, editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar, was also battling ovarian cancer.  Hoping to help other women going through the same ordeal, Liz discovered OCRF, and then devoted herself to serving as its first president, propelling the organization to a national platform.  Liz, along with her good friend Donna Karan, and many others, started OCRF’s signature summer fundraiser, Super Saturday, hosting the first one in Liz’s backyard.  Today, the event raises over $3.5 million annually for ovarian cancer research, and serves as a lasting legacy to Liz and all that she did to ensure the success of OCRF.

OCRF is now the oldest and largest charity in the U.S. funding ovarian cancer research.  OCRF has invested over $65 million in research through 237 grants to scientists at nearly 70 leading medical centers.   Complementing our research, OCRF also launched a signature patient program in 2012, Woman to Woman, for women undergoing treatment for any type of gynecologic cancer.  OCRF continues to realize our founding vision, while serving the people that need help and support now.  Through research, education and support to families living through an ovarian cancer diagnosis, OCRF funds the research and programs needed to ensure hope for a future without ovarian cancer.