OCRF & Ovarian Cancer National Alliance are now one strong, united, inspiring voice!
Ovarian Cancer Research Fund (OCRF) and the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (OCNA) have led the way in advocacy, research and support for patients and their families for over 22 years. As of January 2016, we are pleased to announce we are joining together to form Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance (OCRFA), the largest global organization dedicated to advancing ovarian cancer research while supporting women and their families. Read the exciting news!

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OCRFA Statement on Results of GOG 252

April 11, 2016 – Many members of the ovarian cancer community have been concerned about the results of GOG 252 clinical trial, which were released last month at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology’s Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer. OCRFA consulted with a team of our scientific experts, and... 

Updated ICON6 Final Progression Free Survival analysis

(March 31, 2016) The Lancet has recently published an update to the progression-free survival (PFS) data of the ICON6 trial.  (The preliminary data was first presented at the European Society of Medical Oncology congress in 2013.) ICON6 is a randomized three-arm, three stage, double-blind, placebo-controlled... 

Research Updates from SGO Annual Meeting

(March 30, 2016) OCRFA staff and volunteers recently attended the Society of Gynecologic Oncology’s (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer, held March 19-22, 2016 in San Diego.  Every year women’s cancer physicians and researchers gather at this meeting to discuss the latest in the... 

Study Defines Characteristics of Long-Term Ovarian Cancer Survivors

(March 22, 2016) A new article in Gynecologic Oncology describes clinical features—some surprising—found in women surviving high-grade serous carcinoma for ten or more years. OCRF Scientific Advisory Committee member and former grantee Douglas A. Levine, MD was senior author of the paper. The study,... 

Q&A with OCRFA Grantee Jill Madden, Ph.D.

Jill Madden, PhD Q&A with Jill Madden, PhD University of Kansas Medical Center Research Institute, Inc. 2016 Ann Schreiber Mentored Investigator Award   OCRFA: Tell me about yourself. Did you always want to be a scientist? Were you interested in science as a child? Jill Madden: I grew up on... 

The Institute of Medicine Reports on Ovarian Cancer

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently released a report commissioned by Congress, Ovarian Cancers: Evolving Paradigms in Research and Care. The report provides an in-depth look at the state of ovarian cancer in the United States. While significant progress has been made in the fight against ovarian... 

Dose-dense Weekly Paclitaxel Does Not Increase PFS

(March 3, 2016) In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine this week, researchers report that a dose-dense weekly paclitaxel regimen failed to improve progression-free survival in advanced ovarian cancer versus a conventional regimen and optional bevacizumab (Avastin). Patients treated... 

What You Need to Know About Talcum Powder and Ovarian Cancer

(February 24, 2016) Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance provides information based on medical research and best practices. Research regarding a connection between the use of talcum powder and increased ovarian cancer risk is inconclusive. The verdict of a recent trial regarding talcum powder will not... 

OCRF Research Illuminates Origins of PPM1D Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Patients

(February 24, 2016) Research led by Dr. Elizabeth Swisher at the University of Washington, funded in part by OCRFA and published this month in JAMA Oncology, shows that mutations in the gene PPM1D in women with ovarian cancer are the result of aging and chemotherapy exposure. Click here to read the abstract. Previously,... 

OCRF Research Defines How Satb1 Gene Goes from Helpful to Harmful in Ovarian Cancer

(February 22, 2016) Imagine a lighthouse on cancer cells that can tell the T-cells in our immune system precisely where to attack to stop cancer in its tracks. When working properly, that’s exactly what dendritic cells do. They break down cancer cells into antigens that T-cells can “read” and know...