Survivor Stories / Tributes

Charlotte Adams

Personal Description:

Dedication:

This page has been created to honor the memory of our mother Charlotte S. Adams for her lifetime of love, support, and guidance.

Personal Description:

CHARLOTTE SWENSON ADAMS

Charlotte Swenson Adams of Exeter, NH died on February 26, 2010 of ovarian cancer, age 86. She was born on May 22, 1923 in Worcester, MA, the only daughter of Harold Ekman Swenson and Olive Goodwin Swenson and was a life-long resident of Millbury, MA until moving to NH in 1995. She graduated from Millbury High School in 1940, and received an A.B. degree from Radcliffe College in 1943 (class of 1944). In 1962 she received her teaching certificate from Clark University and later an M.Ed. degree from Worcester State College. She went on to teach science at Grafton Street Jr. High School and Harrington Way Jr. High School in Worcester from 1962-1979. She married Bradford Simonds Adams, also of Millbury, on August 8, 1943, a marriage that lasted happily until his death in May, 2006. A biologist by training and nature, and an acute observer of different cultures through world travel, she was an inspiring and adoring mother, grandmother, great grandmother, and aunt, as well as a respected friend to many others. She leaves four children: Prudence Adams, wife of William A. Finn of Charleston, SC; Linda Adams, wife of Robert J. Begiebing, of Newfields, NH; Charbra Adams, wife of Loftus T. Jestin of Farmington, CT; and Bradford Simonds Adams, Jr. husband of Sherry Flanagan Adams, of Lake Bluff, IL; as well as 6 grandchildren, 5 great grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. A burial service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, 14 Pennsylvania Plaza, Suite 1400, NY, NY 10122 or at ocrf.org.

Last updated on: 03/02/2010


Comments:

I recently took a cosrue with a great sculptor, Andrew Cawrse, who told me that famous sculptor Richard MacDonald works with dancers who perform for the Cirque de Soleil. MacDonald uses a special fabric that the circus performers use for training purposes; you can only buy in Las Vegas (apparently) and also off shore – it is an incredibly strong silk that is made specifically for the purpose of acrobatic training and can hold several people at a time without tearing. The cloth (i have no idea what it is called) is strung up in his studio beams so he can pose models in difficult and extreme positions to help hold up arms and backs if leaning back, etc. If you look at the sculptures on his website you can see how there is no way a model could possibly hold these poses unless they had a little help!Cool stuff!

Friedemann Friedemann – 09/03/2012